Philogos Foundation for the Furtherance of Fundamental Philosophical Thought and Inquiry

PHILOSOPHY    •    RELIGION    •    ENLIGHTENMENT

- The  Truth  be  Told -

  

Table of Contents

Foreword
vii
Preface
ix
Author's Comments
xii
Introduction
xix
Prologue
1
On the Ultimate Essential, Consequential
2
On Relative "Reality," Realization and True Awareness
7
On the Nature of Things and On Essential Nature
15
We are All Sinners
21
On the God Concept
25
On the Physicist's Equation
27
On Subconscious Awareness
33
On Original Thought, Ultimate Knowledge and Understanding
37
On the Province of Human Judgment, Horizon and Philosophy
43
On Imperfection and the Perfect State
49
On Our Time
51
On the True Maker - Deity or Impostor?
57
On the Condition of Religions
59
On Man's Shame
61
On Eternity and the Temporal
63
On the Necessity and Esoteric of the Inquiry
65
Reflections
71
On Nature and the Object World
79
On the Categorical Judgment on the Non-Cognizant Worlds
81
Concluding Remarks
85

 

Excerpt

ON THE ULTIMATE ESSENTIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL

In search of the ultimate criterion for finding true purpose and rationality in physical being and existence — toward understanding what it’s all about — there are mighty few disciplines to turn to, really. There are Science, Religion, Philosophy (reflecting, reasoning, deducing, cognizing, concluding); and then there is Hocus-Pocus, and -- can you think of any other discipline that might cloister life's ultimate secrets, purpose and promise?

We might start by deliberating the gamut of science’s findings, or by going into exhaustive religious discussions -- but let's first take an overview of what we are trying to accomplish. In ultimate ends, should we really expect our answers to come from science's deep-seated last secrets, or from near-perfect delusion and edicts of religious rites and traditions? Or, all considered, would it not be more appropriate and important for us to find up front whether it all is – very basically, fundamentally – rational, of good purpose, right or wrong, adequate or inadequate, in true essential nature? I opt for the latter.

If all the stuff of science, whatever it may yield for us, were not to measure up to 'good, adequate, moral and right', then we would surely have to ignore that discipline as one of our appropriate means of exploring the deep mysteries of existence. For in our proper, correct judgment, most assuredly an ultimate good and right purpose must be a paramount consideration, a prerequisite to any valid finding on the adequacy and rationality of being and existence. Science certainly has helped us like no other discipline toward understanding our tangible, physical worlds, but can it be the one to give us ultimate (metaphysical) answers? It is doubtful that it could deal with right or wrong, or even with rationality, as it appears very much in a class with inanimate phenomena, having no subjectivity of its own. It will do anything you want it to do, even in negative demonic patronage. Is the true ultimate criterion, then, an ethical, a moral question – in judgment over right and wrong, over error, ignorance and sin versus bliss and enlightenment? For us, an emphatic YES — and with the right awareness it is clearly a question of rationality as well.

Rightfully then – in ultimate consequence – the moral, ethical issue, right or wrong, good or evil, adequacy versus inadequacy, emerge as our final and rational determinants. The circle is complete when morality is in accord with rationality. Moral and rational, the correct combination – the way it ought to be, and is, when things are right.

It is my sure sense that it is this simple way with our life's last consequence -- the ultimate criterion being a question of the rationality, of the morality, the adequacy of the nature of our being in light of highest universal principles – as the brief encounter with consciousness that is human life struggles toward its full self-realization.

  Philogos Tabula Rasa On the Manifest Need for Fundamental Philosophical Redirection and Realization

In man's quest to find real purpose,

there can be little doubt that he sees the

overriding mission of his existence in

the attainment of higher status than his own.

 

The problem is that man insists on remaining in

his (limited) physical state of being, in "seeing,

hearing, touching, experiencing, controlling" things.

Doings that he cannot conceive of the higher levels

affording him, so he keeps groveling in his imperfect,

suffering, ‘controlling’ yet helpless, hopeless state.

-- The Author